Tuesday, 23 May 2017

The history of human evolution has been rewritten after scientists discovered that Europe was the birthplace of mankind, not Africa. 
Currently, most experts believe that our human lineage split from apes around seven million years ago in central Africa, where hominids remained for the next five million years before venturing further afield. 
But two fossils of an ape-like creature which had human-like teeth have been found in Bulgaria and Greece, dating to 7.2 million years ago. 
The discovery of the creature, named Graecopithecus freybergi, and nicknameded ‘El Graeco' by scientists, proves our ancestors were already starting to evolve in Europe 200,000 years before the earliest African hominid. 
An international team of researchers say the findings entirely change the beginning of human history and place the last common ancestor of both chimpanzees and humans - the so-called Missing Link - in the Mediterranean region. 
At that time climate change had turned Eastern Europe into an open savannah which forced apes to find new food sources, sparking a shift towards bipedalism, the researchers believe. 
“This study changes the ideas related to the knowledge about the time and the place of the first steps of the humankind,” said Professor Nikolai Spassov from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. “Graecopithecus is not an ape. He is a member of the tribe of hominins and the direct ancestor of homo."
..."We were surprised by our results, as pre-humans were previously known only from sub-Saharan Africa," said doctoral student Jochen Fuss, a Tübingen PhD student who conducted this part of the study. 
Professor David Begun, a University of Toronto paleoanthropologist and co-author of this study, added: "This dating allows us to move the human-chimpanzee split into the Mediterranean area." 
During the period the Mediterranean Sea went through frequent periods of drying up completely, forming a land bridge between Europe and Africa and allowing apes and early hominids to pass between the continents. 
The team believe that evolution of hominids may have been driven by dramatic environmental changes which sparked the formation of the North African Sahara more than seven million years ago and pushed species further North. They found large amounts of Saharan sand in layers dating from the period, suggesting that it lay much further North than today. 
Professor Böhme added: "Our findings may eventually change our ideas about the origin of humanity. I personally don't think that the descendants of Graecopithecus die out, they may have spread to Africa later. The split of chimps and humans was a single event. Our data support the view that this split was happening in the eastern Mediterranean - not in Africa. "If accepted, this theory will indeed alter the very beginning of human history."
Source

Hopefully this will put an end to the "We're all from Africa" line.

6 comments:

  1. Yup, you are all from my country :)

    I think the oldest civilizations in Europe were also those from the Balkan Peninsula - those like the Danube and the Vinca civilizations - older than the Sumerian and maybe even the Egyptian civilizations.

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  2. NO FUNDO FAZ SENTIDO POIS UM MACACO VIVENDO NA FLORESTA EQUATORIAL TERIA PERMANECIDO NA ARVORE A ALTA LATITUDE SEMPRE FOI MAIS PROPICIA A SALTOS EVOLUTIVOS

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  3. O CRESCIMENTO DO CEREBRO NESSES SERES EVIDENCIAM ERAS GLACIAIS NO NORTE

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  4. O MESMO PADRÃO POSTERIOR DO CROMAGNIDEO POR ISSO QUE NA AFRICA ESTAGNARAM EM MACACOS

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  5. O MESMO PADRÃO POSTERIOR DO CROMAGNIDEO POR ISSO QUE NA AFRICA ESTAGNARAM EM MACACOS

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  6. Interesting to note the scientists in this study weren't jewish. Jews would have suppressed it.

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